MSU: Stadium plans for games

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Re: MSU: Stadium plans for games

Post by coloradocat » Tue Jul 21, 2020 5:10 pm

https://www.thescore.com/ncaaf/news/198 ... o-covid-19

Not sure how that's going to work with the combination of students and season ticket holders unless they just don't sell any single game tickets. Even then there won't be distancing. They'd have to reassign season ticket holders different seats and give students specific seats rather than a section. I still say fans at games is all or nothing, no matter how big your stadium is.



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Re: MSU: Stadium plans for games

Post by imacat » Tue Jul 21, 2020 6:04 pm

From the Gallatin County Health Department ... https://406mtsports.com/college/big-sky ... b2e3a.html



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Re: MSU: Stadium plans for games

Post by cats2506 » Wed Jul 22, 2020 7:53 am

coloradocat wrote:
Tue Jul 21, 2020 4:48 pm
cats2506 wrote:
Tue Jul 21, 2020 4:39 pm
Wuhan flu will be a thing of the past on November 4th
Go back to the other thread. Let's at least try to keep this one related to football.
You saying that stadium plans are not affected by the manufactured crises that is the Wuhan Flu?


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Re: MSU: Stadium plans for games

Post by 94VegasCat » Wed Jul 22, 2020 3:35 pm

Not sure if this has been posted before:



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Re: MSU: Stadium plans for games

Post by catsrback76 » Thu Jul 23, 2020 9:10 am

I came across this read on NPR regarding the impact of people wearing cloth masks.

"Mokdad and colleagues with the University of Washington's Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation did what's called a meta-analysis."You take every study that has been published on the protective effect of masks, and then you reanalyze all the data," says Mokdad.

Their bottom-line estimate: If 95% of people wear cloth masks when they're out and about interacting with other people, it reduces transmission by at least 30%. In other words, each infected person will go on to infect 30% fewer people.

Mokdad stresses that this is a conservative finding. It uses the lower bound within the range of estimates. And it assumes all the masks are cloth rather than surgical masks or N95 respirators, which are even more effective. "Widespread mask [use] could be even more powerful," says Mokdad, because some portion of people would likely be using those more protective versions.

Yet even with a 30% reduction in transmission, the cumulative impact on a community can be massive. To understand why, it helps to consider some math: The coronavirus spreads exponentially. For example, let's say in a place where no one is wearing masks, each infected person is currently passing the virus to 1.03 others. This means 100 infected people will go on to infect 103 others, who in turn infect 106 others, who infect 109 and so on. The result is that in, say, seven five-day cycles of infection, a total of 889 people will have contracted the virus.

But if you curb the transmission rate by 30%, this means that instead of infecting 1.03 others, each infected person passes the virus on to only 0.72 others. So now 100 infected people go on to infect only 72 people. These 72 go on to infect just 52 people in the next cycle. By the seventh cycle, only 10 new people are infected, and only a total of 332 people have contracted the virus altogether. Essentially, instead of exponential growth you've triggered what's called exponential decay."



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Re: MSU: Stadium plans for games

Post by coloradocat » Thu Jul 23, 2020 9:25 am

94VegasCat wrote:
Wed Jul 22, 2020 3:35 pm
Not sure if this has been posted before:

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Re: MSU: Stadium plans for games

Post by ilovethecats » Thu Jul 23, 2020 9:50 am

catsrback76 wrote:
Thu Jul 23, 2020 9:10 am
I came across this read on NPR regarding the impact of people wearing cloth masks.

"Mokdad and colleagues with the University of Washington's Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation did what's called a meta-analysis."You take every study that has been published on the protective effect of masks, and then you reanalyze all the data," says Mokdad.

Their bottom-line estimate: If 95% of people wear cloth masks when they're out and about interacting with other people, it reduces transmission by at least 30%. In other words, each infected person will go on to infect 30% fewer people.

Mokdad stresses that this is a conservative finding. It uses the lower bound within the range of estimates. And it assumes all the masks are cloth rather than surgical masks or N95 respirators, which are even more effective. "Widespread mask [use] could be even more powerful," says Mokdad, because some portion of people would likely be using those more protective versions.

Yet even with a 30% reduction in transmission, the cumulative impact on a community can be massive. To understand why, it helps to consider some math: The coronavirus spreads exponentially. For example, let's say in a place where no one is wearing masks, each infected person is currently passing the virus to 1.03 others. This means 100 infected people will go on to infect 103 others, who in turn infect 106 others, who infect 109 and so on. The result is that in, say, seven five-day cycles of infection, a total of 889 people will have contracted the virus.

But if you curb the transmission rate by 30%, this means that instead of infecting 1.03 others, each infected person passes the virus on to only 0.72 others. So now 100 infected people go on to infect only 72 people. These 72 go on to infect just 52 people in the next cycle. By the seventh cycle, only 10 new people are infected, and only a total of 332 people have contracted the virus altogether. Essentially, instead of exponential growth you've triggered what's called exponential decay."
Good info.

Personally I've never disputed the benefits of the mask. If worn correctly, it seems to be simple science that it should help.

My concern is that from what I've seen, and my own personal habits; does the benefit of the mask outweigh the negatives that come with it. For instance, when wearing mine I'm on my feet all day doing manual labor most of the time. I sweat like crazy, am constantly adjusting it, taking it off to rubbing my face, etc. I usually wear just the one, sometimes two if it gets real bad. If I was following the CDC guidelines I'd honestly probably need 30 or more a day.

I see similar bad habits every time I go to the store. Pay attention next time and you'll see what I mean. People pulling it down to talk to other people. Men putting theirs in their pockets when they leave. Women shoving theirs in their purses after use. People touching all kinds of products that others have touched, then touching masks, then touching products, then the cart, then their mask, etc etc.

Again, I'm not saying that they don't work. I just know for me personally, especially wearing them at work, by the end of the day I feel like I have a dirty germ sponge on my face. Not to mention the disposal of them. People definitely aren't sealing them in ziplocks! Hell, for as many as I see on the ground or in parking lots, it seems like people have a hard enough time even finding a garbage!



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Re: MSU: Stadium plans for games

Post by catsrback76 » Thu Jul 23, 2020 11:39 pm

ilovethecats wrote:
Thu Jul 23, 2020 9:50 am
catsrback76 wrote:
Thu Jul 23, 2020 9:10 am
I came across this read on NPR regarding the impact of people wearing cloth masks.

"Mokdad and colleagues with the University of Washington's Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation did what's called a meta-analysis."You take every study that has been published on the protective effect of masks, and then you reanalyze all the data," says Mokdad.

Their bottom-line estimate: If 95% of people wear cloth masks when they're out and about interacting with other people, it reduces transmission by at least 30%. In other words, each infected person will go on to infect 30% fewer people.

Mokdad stresses that this is a conservative finding. It uses the lower bound within the range of estimates. And it assumes all the masks are cloth rather than surgical masks or N95 respirators, which are even more effective. "Widespread mask [use] could be even more powerful," says Mokdad, because some portion of people would likely be using those more protective versions.

Yet even with a 30% reduction in transmission, the cumulative impact on a community can be massive. To understand why, it helps to consider some math: The coronavirus spreads exponentially. For example, let's say in a place where no one is wearing masks, each infected person is currently passing the virus to 1.03 others. This means 100 infected people will go on to infect 103 others, who in turn infect 106 others, who infect 109 and so on. The result is that in, say, seven five-day cycles of infection, a total of 889 people will have contracted the virus.

But if you curb the transmission rate by 30%, this means that instead of infecting 1.03 others, each infected person passes the virus on to only 0.72 others. So now 100 infected people go on to infect only 72 people. These 72 go on to infect just 52 people in the next cycle. By the seventh cycle, only 10 new people are infected, and only a total of 332 people have contracted the virus altogether. Essentially, instead of exponential growth you've triggered what's called exponential decay."
Good info.

Personally I've never disputed the benefits of the mask. If worn correctly, it seems to be simple science that it should help.

My concern is that from what I've seen, and my own personal habits; does the benefit of the mask outweigh the negatives that come with it. For instance, when wearing mine I'm on my feet all day doing manual labor most of the time. I sweat like crazy, am constantly adjusting it, taking it off to rubbing my face, etc. I usually wear just the one, sometimes two if it gets real bad. If I was following the CDC guidelines I'd honestly probably need 30 or more a day.

I see similar bad habits every time I go to the store. Pay attention next time and you'll see what I mean. People pulling it down to talk to other people. Men putting theirs in their pockets when they leave. Women shoving theirs in their purses after use. People touching all kinds of products that others have touched, then touching masks, then touching products, then the cart, then their mask, etc etc.

Again, I'm not saying that they don't work. I just know for me personally, especially wearing them at work, by the end of the day I feel like I have a dirty germ sponge on my face. Not to mention the disposal of them. People definitely aren't sealing them in ziplocks! Hell, for as many as I see on the ground or in parking lots, it seems like people have a hard enough time even finding a garbage!
Yes, there is an inconvenience in wearing the mask...but there is also a "convenience" as a result. I think the problem of cloth masks is solved by having more than 1 cloth mask. Wash up, mask up, and enjoy the Cats live and in person...possibly.



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Re: MSU: Stadium plans for games

Post by thefrank1 » Fri Jul 24, 2020 8:09 am

There is a good cartoon in the chronicle this morning that asks the question: Which is the greater terrorist threat 1) a mask or 2) a van load of unidentified federal agents in an unmarked bus? Should we get a poll going?


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Re: MSU: Stadium plans for games

Post by ilovethecats » Fri Jul 24, 2020 9:06 pm

catsrback76 wrote:
Thu Jul 23, 2020 11:39 pm
ilovethecats wrote:
Thu Jul 23, 2020 9:50 am
catsrback76 wrote:
Thu Jul 23, 2020 9:10 am
I came across this read on NPR regarding the impact of people wearing cloth masks.

"Mokdad and colleagues with the University of Washington's Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation did what's called a meta-analysis."You take every study that has been published on the protective effect of masks, and then you reanalyze all the data," says Mokdad.

Their bottom-line estimate: If 95% of people wear cloth masks when they're out and about interacting with other people, it reduces transmission by at least 30%. In other words, each infected person will go on to infect 30% fewer people.

Mokdad stresses that this is a conservative finding. It uses the lower bound within the range of estimates. And it assumes all the masks are cloth rather than surgical masks or N95 respirators, which are even more effective. "Widespread mask [use] could be even more powerful," says Mokdad, because some portion of people would likely be using those more protective versions.

Yet even with a 30% reduction in transmission, the cumulative impact on a community can be massive. To understand why, it helps to consider some math: The coronavirus spreads exponentially. For example, let's say in a place where no one is wearing masks, each infected person is currently passing the virus to 1.03 others. This means 100 infected people will go on to infect 103 others, who in turn infect 106 others, who infect 109 and so on. The result is that in, say, seven five-day cycles of infection, a total of 889 people will have contracted the virus.

But if you curb the transmission rate by 30%, this means that instead of infecting 1.03 others, each infected person passes the virus on to only 0.72 others. So now 100 infected people go on to infect only 72 people. These 72 go on to infect just 52 people in the next cycle. By the seventh cycle, only 10 new people are infected, and only a total of 332 people have contracted the virus altogether. Essentially, instead of exponential growth you've triggered what's called exponential decay."
Good info.

Personally I've never disputed the benefits of the mask. If worn correctly, it seems to be simple science that it should help.

My concern is that from what I've seen, and my own personal habits; does the benefit of the mask outweigh the negatives that come with it. For instance, when wearing mine I'm on my feet all day doing manual labor most of the time. I sweat like crazy, am constantly adjusting it, taking it off to rubbing my face, etc. I usually wear just the one, sometimes two if it gets real bad. If I was following the CDC guidelines I'd honestly probably need 30 or more a day.

I see similar bad habits every time I go to the store. Pay attention next time and you'll see what I mean. People pulling it down to talk to other people. Men putting theirs in their pockets when they leave. Women shoving theirs in their purses after use. People touching all kinds of products that others have touched, then touching masks, then touching products, then the cart, then their mask, etc etc.

Again, I'm not saying that they don't work. I just know for me personally, especially wearing them at work, by the end of the day I feel like I have a dirty germ sponge on my face. Not to mention the disposal of them. People definitely aren't sealing them in ziplocks! Hell, for as many as I see on the ground or in parking lots, it seems like people have a hard enough time even finding a garbage!
Yes, there is an inconvenience in wearing the mask...but there is also a "convenience" as a result. I think the problem of cloth masks is solved by having more than 1 cloth mask. Wash up, mask up, and enjoy the Cats live and in person...possibly.
Did you see the pics of Fauci at the baseball game yesterday? The guy who is the be all end all of viruses? Wearing his mask under his nose. Then not wearing it at all. The lady he was with holding hers in her hand. And this is the one person on the planet who should know better. Multiply that obliviousness by 50 and you get all the rest of us.

On a related note I popped into a watering hole this afternoon before a round of golf and had to ask the bartender if she minded discarding the used paper mask that was sitting on the bar. She picked it up, tossed it, and grabbed me a beer. Bare hands, no gloves, no washing. I’m sorry but people are dreaming if they think this kind of grossness isn’t happening all day every day.



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Re: MSU: Stadium plans for games

Post by MSU01 » Fri Jul 24, 2020 9:31 pm

ilovethecats wrote:
Fri Jul 24, 2020 9:06 pm
catsrback76 wrote:
Thu Jul 23, 2020 11:39 pm
ilovethecats wrote:
Thu Jul 23, 2020 9:50 am
catsrback76 wrote:
Thu Jul 23, 2020 9:10 am
I came across this read on NPR regarding the impact of people wearing cloth masks.

"Mokdad and colleagues with the University of Washington's Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation did what's called a meta-analysis."You take every study that has been published on the protective effect of masks, and then you reanalyze all the data," says Mokdad.

Their bottom-line estimate: If 95% of people wear cloth masks when they're out and about interacting with other people, it reduces transmission by at least 30%. In other words, each infected person will go on to infect 30% fewer people.

Mokdad stresses that this is a conservative finding. It uses the lower bound within the range of estimates. And it assumes all the masks are cloth rather than surgical masks or N95 respirators, which are even more effective. "Widespread mask [use] could be even more powerful," says Mokdad, because some portion of people would likely be using those more protective versions.

Yet even with a 30% reduction in transmission, the cumulative impact on a community can be massive. To understand why, it helps to consider some math: The coronavirus spreads exponentially. For example, let's say in a place where no one is wearing masks, each infected person is currently passing the virus to 1.03 others. This means 100 infected people will go on to infect 103 others, who in turn infect 106 others, who infect 109 and so on. The result is that in, say, seven five-day cycles of infection, a total of 889 people will have contracted the virus.

But if you curb the transmission rate by 30%, this means that instead of infecting 1.03 others, each infected person passes the virus on to only 0.72 others. So now 100 infected people go on to infect only 72 people. These 72 go on to infect just 52 people in the next cycle. By the seventh cycle, only 10 new people are infected, and only a total of 332 people have contracted the virus altogether. Essentially, instead of exponential growth you've triggered what's called exponential decay."
Good info.

Personally I've never disputed the benefits of the mask. If worn correctly, it seems to be simple science that it should help.

My concern is that from what I've seen, and my own personal habits; does the benefit of the mask outweigh the negatives that come with it. For instance, when wearing mine I'm on my feet all day doing manual labor most of the time. I sweat like crazy, am constantly adjusting it, taking it off to rubbing my face, etc. I usually wear just the one, sometimes two if it gets real bad. If I was following the CDC guidelines I'd honestly probably need 30 or more a day.

I see similar bad habits every time I go to the store. Pay attention next time and you'll see what I mean. People pulling it down to talk to other people. Men putting theirs in their pockets when they leave. Women shoving theirs in their purses after use. People touching all kinds of products that others have touched, then touching masks, then touching products, then the cart, then their mask, etc etc.

Again, I'm not saying that they don't work. I just know for me personally, especially wearing them at work, by the end of the day I feel like I have a dirty germ sponge on my face. Not to mention the disposal of them. People definitely aren't sealing them in ziplocks! Hell, for as many as I see on the ground or in parking lots, it seems like people have a hard enough time even finding a garbage!
Yes, there is an inconvenience in wearing the mask...but there is also a "convenience" as a result. I think the problem of cloth masks is solved by having more than 1 cloth mask. Wash up, mask up, and enjoy the Cats live and in person...possibly.
Did you see the pics of Fauci at the baseball game yesterday? The guy who is the be all end all of viruses? Wearing his mask under his nose. Then not wearing it at all. The lady he was with holding hers in her hand. And this is the one person on the planet who should know better. Multiply that obliviousness by 50 and you get all the rest of us.

On a related note I popped into a watering hole this afternoon before a round of golf and had to ask the bartender if she minded discarding the used paper mask that was sitting on the bar. She picked it up, tossed it, and grabbed me a beer. Bare hands, no gloves, no washing. I’m sorry but people are dreaming if they think this kind of grossness isn’t happening all day every day.
Look, masks aren't going to be used correctly by everyone and we can all post our anecdotal stories of people not wearing masks, not using them properly, or other less than sanitary behaviors. But we also don't need them to eliminate every transmission of the virus, which is impossible to do. The point is that if we can lower the transmission rate enough to get the R-value (average number of cases transmitted by each person infected) below 1, then very simple math tells us that exponential growth turns into exponential decay, and the virus will go away over time. Virtually all the science out there tells us that no, masks aren't perfect, but yes, they do provide some level of protection and lower the transmission rate.


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Re: MSU: Stadium plans for games

Post by ilovethecats » Fri Jul 24, 2020 11:10 pm

MSU01 wrote:
Fri Jul 24, 2020 9:31 pm
ilovethecats wrote:
Fri Jul 24, 2020 9:06 pm
catsrback76 wrote:
Thu Jul 23, 2020 11:39 pm
ilovethecats wrote:
Thu Jul 23, 2020 9:50 am
catsrback76 wrote:
Thu Jul 23, 2020 9:10 am
I came across this read on NPR regarding the impact of people wearing cloth masks.

"Mokdad and colleagues with the University of Washington's Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation did what's called a meta-analysis."You take every study that has been published on the protective effect of masks, and then you reanalyze all the data," says Mokdad.

Their bottom-line estimate: If 95% of people wear cloth masks when they're out and about interacting with other people, it reduces transmission by at least 30%. In other words, each infected person will go on to infect 30% fewer people.

Mokdad stresses that this is a conservative finding. It uses the lower bound within the range of estimates. And it assumes all the masks are cloth rather than surgical masks or N95 respirators, which are even more effective. "Widespread mask [use] could be even more powerful," says Mokdad, because some portion of people would likely be using those more protective versions.

Yet even with a 30% reduction in transmission, the cumulative impact on a community can be massive. To understand why, it helps to consider some math: The coronavirus spreads exponentially. For example, let's say in a place where no one is wearing masks, each infected person is currently passing the virus to 1.03 others. This means 100 infected people will go on to infect 103 others, who in turn infect 106 others, who infect 109 and so on. The result is that in, say, seven five-day cycles of infection, a total of 889 people will have contracted the virus.

But if you curb the transmission rate by 30%, this means that instead of infecting 1.03 others, each infected person passes the virus on to only 0.72 others. So now 100 infected people go on to infect only 72 people. These 72 go on to infect just 52 people in the next cycle. By the seventh cycle, only 10 new people are infected, and only a total of 332 people have contracted the virus altogether. Essentially, instead of exponential growth you've triggered what's called exponential decay."
Good info.

Personally I've never disputed the benefits of the mask. If worn correctly, it seems to be simple science that it should help.

My concern is that from what I've seen, and my own personal habits; does the benefit of the mask outweigh the negatives that come with it. For instance, when wearing mine I'm on my feet all day doing manual labor most of the time. I sweat like crazy, am constantly adjusting it, taking it off to rubbing my face, etc. I usually wear just the one, sometimes two if it gets real bad. If I was following the CDC guidelines I'd honestly probably need 30 or more a day.

I see similar bad habits every time I go to the store. Pay attention next time and you'll see what I mean. People pulling it down to talk to other people. Men putting theirs in their pockets when they leave. Women shoving theirs in their purses after use. People touching all kinds of products that others have touched, then touching masks, then touching products, then the cart, then their mask, etc etc.

Again, I'm not saying that they don't work. I just know for me personally, especially wearing them at work, by the end of the day I feel like I have a dirty germ sponge on my face. Not to mention the disposal of them. People definitely aren't sealing them in ziplocks! Hell, for as many as I see on the ground or in parking lots, it seems like people have a hard enough time even finding a garbage!
Yes, there is an inconvenience in wearing the mask...but there is also a "convenience" as a result. I think the problem of cloth masks is solved by having more than 1 cloth mask. Wash up, mask up, and enjoy the Cats live and in person...possibly.
Did you see the pics of Fauci at the baseball game yesterday? The guy who is the be all end all of viruses? Wearing his mask under his nose. Then not wearing it at all. The lady he was with holding hers in her hand. And this is the one person on the planet who should know better. Multiply that obliviousness by 50 and you get all the rest of us.

On a related note I popped into a watering hole this afternoon before a round of golf and had to ask the bartender if she minded discarding the used paper mask that was sitting on the bar. She picked it up, tossed it, and grabbed me a beer. Bare hands, no gloves, no washing. I’m sorry but people are dreaming if they think this kind of grossness isn’t happening all day every day.
Look, masks aren't going to be used correctly by everyone and we can all post our anecdotal stories of people not wearing masks, not using them properly, or other less than sanitary behaviors. But we also don't need them to eliminate every transmission of the virus, which is impossible to do. The point is that if we can lower the transmission rate enough to get the R-value (average number of cases transmitted by each person infected) below 1, then very simple math tells us that exponential growth turns into exponential decay, and the virus will go away over time. Virtually all the science out there tells us that no, masks aren't perfect, but yes, they do provide some level of protection and lower the transmission rate.
Agreed. Thank you.



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Re: MSU: Stadium plans for games

Post by Helcat72 » Sat Jul 25, 2020 12:28 am

The math performed to illustrate how the curve can be flattened and reduced is probably the first thing the South Koreans and Chinese were told when it first started. The governments of these two nations knew how to quell it. Our leaders had more sophisticated theorems. How the work of two years of pandemic can be done in 5 months. Too bad that was a bad theorem, it cost a trillion dollars and we are in worse shape than before. Instead of one New York....we have 3! Shut down shut up and start over!


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