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Eastern Washington Looking at Cutting Football and/or Athletics

Posted: Fri Feb 14, 2020 9:14 am
by The Butcher

Re: Eastern Washington Looking at Cutting Football and/or Athletics

Posted: Fri Feb 14, 2020 10:42 am
by kmax
I would be surprised to see this get real legs. This appears to be a faculty led report that was not requested/prompted by the school itself or the trustees but rather a reaction by faculty to recent budget cuts that hit education and (at least in the faculties eyes) not the athletic department. Maybe they cut the institutional support a bit or something but I doubt it ends in dropping down or cutting individual programs or the entirety of athletics. Gotta think this is a pretty big bubble burst for their efforts to improve the stadium and other facilities though.

Re: Eastern Washington Looking at Cutting Football and/or Athletics

Posted: Fri Feb 14, 2020 12:31 pm
by grizzh8r
The report then examines what would happen if EWU maintained its Division I status, but eliminated football. That would save up to $3.5 million per year. The report calls this a "moral choice."

"This choice would anger a few vocal fans, but would show Eastern as standing up for the principles we publicly espouse: That we are here to help our students learn and successfully launch careers. We are not here to have them trade brain damage for a reduced-cost education," it says.

Sounds like someone has an axe to grind...

Re: Eastern Washington Looking at Cutting Football and/or Athletics

Posted: Fri Feb 14, 2020 1:16 pm
by GoCats18
Hopefully UM is next!!

Re: Eastern Washington Looking at Cutting Football and/or Athletics

Posted: Fri Feb 14, 2020 1:26 pm
by HelenaCat
GoCats18 wrote:
Fri Feb 14, 2020 1:16 pm
Hopefully UM is next!!
I am actually surprised something like this has not come out of um. Some faculty at um now seeing this may do something similar....I can only imagine what many faculty there are thinking over the last several years with faculty and curriculum cuts, but nothing ever being cut from athletics. Most academia types are not big sports fans anyway, so all the cuts affecting their world but not the athletic area has to bother them quite a bit. The dollars numbers at um would not be as pronounced as they appear to be at EWU, but as enrollment continues to plummet this type of discussion certainly has to be in many people’s minds.

Re: Eastern Washington Looking at Cutting Football and/or Athletics

Posted: Fri Feb 14, 2020 3:11 pm
by Montanabob
Similar thing being looked at at northern Colorado. We may see Dixie State fill one of there spots and shrink the number of football teams in the BSC.

Re: Eastern Washington Looking at Cutting Football and/or Athletics

Posted: Fri Feb 14, 2020 4:22 pm
by BozoneCat
Really shows the importance of maintaining a good relationship between the athletic department and the faculty at colleges. When I was in school at MSU (96-2001), there was a very similar hatred of the athletics dept. from a large number of professors and academia types that I interacted with. I think Coach Ash and Coach Choate have done a remarkable job of turning that around and I feel there is a strong relationship between the two parties, which adds to the strength of both the athletics programs and the academic portion of the school.

Re: Eastern Washington Looking at Cutting Football and/or Athletics

Posted: Sat Feb 15, 2020 4:02 pm
by coochorama42
BozoneCat wrote:
Fri Feb 14, 2020 4:22 pm
Really shows the importance of maintaining a good relationship between the athletic department and the faculty at colleges. When I was in school at MSU (96-2001), there was a very similar hatred of the athletics dept. from a large number of professors and academia types that I interacted with. I think Coach Ash and Coach Choate have done a remarkable job of turning that around and I feel there is a strong relationship between the two parties, which adds to the strength of both the athletics programs and the academic portion of the school.
As a faculty member, it is difficult to reconcile university athletic budgets with raising your own funds to take your students in a student chapter of a professional organization to a regional conference. In many departments, teaching loads grow while salary is relatively stagnant. Other responsibilities (research and service) are not reduced to compensate for the additional instruction. If EWU is forcing faculty to do more with less, athletics should have to do the same, period. If that means dropping down to Div II or cutting football, so be it.

With respect to the academic/athletic rift at MSU from 1996-2001, I think you will find it within any Div I University at all times. It is all about the money and how it is spent versus how it could be spent.

Re: Eastern Washington Looking at Cutting Football and/or Athletics

Posted: Sat Feb 15, 2020 11:44 pm
by Bobcat4Ever
My Viewpoint — An Unimportant Short Story About MSU and Athletics.

(This discussion started me thinking about my web of MSU connections, past and present, and how athletics fits into it all. And why I think the faculty at EWU is on the wrong track with some of their options.)

I graduated from MSU, had a four year work-study job with a large research project, went to grad school under two different academic departments, was a GRA, worked at MSU forever, taught a few classes on an adjunct basis, retired from MSU. For a long time I used to stick my head into my departmental offices just to stay in touch, made friends over time with some of my favorite professors, the dean, and some upper echelon administrators etc. So, lots of involvement with MSU academics, most but not all from my student standing.

I’ve been a Bobcat fan since before I can remember. My mom and dad took me upstairs in Romney gym to watch my uncle play basketball for the Eastern (MSU-Billings) Yellowjackets. I was at the first Bobcat basketball game in the Fieldhouse. Attended football, men’s and women’s basketball, volleyball and track for well over 50 years. Still watch every game I can on TV or Pluto. So, lots of involvement with athletics.

Over time the academic offices changed, my professors retired and then passed on. The deans and acting deans marched in and out. I quit visiting because I knew no one there, and no one knew me. The only contact I ended up with were dunning letters. The dean sat right behind me at basketball, but was not friendly in the least.

If I were able to walk (or limp) into the athletic offices today, people would recognize me and say hello. A couple of head coaches would see me and stop for a quick chat.

If it were not for athletics, I would have really no connection with MSU. The games, when we could still attend, were wonderful places to mix and meet new people, including lots of academics and administrators. Networking, if you wish. A real boon to my career, as it turned out, even though I met a brand new president by kicking his wife out of my reserved seat! Met and chatted with President Cruzado her second day on campus because of a women’s basketball game. And mental health — nothing better than going to the Brick at the end of a cold, dark, gloomy winter’s day.

When we personally donate, it may not be to athletics, but it is because we are connected through athletics. I cannot imagine an MSU without athletics, or without football, or not competing at the highest level that makes sense. I’ve taken family members to games. One child enrolled (from California) and is still paying that big tuition.

We attend watch parties where MSU alumni gather and watch football. I’ve never been invited to get together and watch an engineering mechanics final. That’s no way intended as a joke — it’s an example of the importance of athletics in remaining connected to MSU. I wear things advertising MSU several days a week, and it often starts conversations. They all were purchased as Bobcat gear, or caught in the air at an event! (Hmmm ... none of my departments ever gave me a T-shirt. I’d wear it proudly if they did.)

I know my story is basically unimportant, but probably not unique. Multiply it by hundreds or thousands of little people like me who live under the big radar beam.

To underestimate athletics as a touchstone to the university as a whole would be a very unwise mistake.

Re: Eastern Washington Looking at Cutting Football and/or Athletics

Posted: Sun Feb 16, 2020 10:38 am
by kwcat
Good post!

Re: Eastern Washington Looking at Cutting Football and/or Athletics

Posted: Sun Feb 16, 2020 10:49 am
by BelgradeBobcat
Bobcat4Ever wrote:
Sat Feb 15, 2020 11:44 pm
I know my story is basically unimportant,
That's the only thing you got wrong in your post. Thanks for sharing. =D^

Re: Eastern Washington Looking at Cutting Football and/or Athletics

Posted: Sun Feb 16, 2020 11:42 am
by Cataholic
Bobcat4Ever wrote:
Sat Feb 15, 2020 11:44 pm
My Viewpoint — An Unimportant Short Story About MSU and Athletics.

(This discussion started me thinking about my web of MSU connections, past and present, and how athletics fits into it all. And why I think the faculty at EWU is on the wrong track with some of their options.)

I graduated from MSU, had a four year work-study job with a large research project, went to grad school under two different academic departments, was a GRA, worked at MSU forever, taught a few classes on an adjunct basis, retired from MSU. For a long time I used to stick my head into my departmental offices just to stay in touch, made friends over time with some of my favorite professors, the dean, and some upper echelon administrators etc. So, lots of involvement with MSU academics, most but not all from my student standing.

I’ve been a Bobcat fan since before I can remember. My mom and dad took me upstairs in Romney gym to watch my uncle play basketball for the Eastern (MSU-Billings) Yellowjackets. I was at the first Bobcat basketball game in the Fieldhouse. Attended football, men’s and women’s basketball, volleyball and track for well over 50 years. Still watch every game I can on TV or Pluto. So, lots of involvement with athletics.

Over time the academic offices changed, my professors retired and then passed on. The deans and acting deans marched in and out. I quit visiting because I knew no one there, and no one knew me. The only contact I ended up with were dunning letters. The dean sat right behind me at basketball, but was not friendly in the least.

If I were able to walk (or limp) into the athletic offices today, people would recognize me and say hello. A couple of head coaches would see me and stop for a quick chat.

If it were not for athletics, I would have really no connection with MSU. The games, when we could still attend, were wonderful places to mix and meet new people, including lots of academics and administrators. Networking, if you wish. A real boon to my career, as it turned out, even though I met a brand new president by kicking his wife out of my reserved seat! Met and chatted with President Cruzado her second day on campus because of a women’s basketball game. And mental health — nothing better than going to the Brick at the end of a cold, dark, gloomy winter’s day.

When we personally donate, it may not be to athletics, but it is because we are connected through athletics. I cannot imagine an MSU without athletics, or without football, or not competing at the highest level that makes sense. I’ve taken family members to games. One child enrolled (from California) and is still paying that big tuition.

We attend watch parties where MSU alumni gather and watch football. I’ve never been invited to get together and watch an engineering mechanics final. That’s no way intended as a joke — it’s an example of the importance of athletics in remaining connected to MSU. I wear things advertising MSU several days a week, and it often starts conversations. They all were purchased as Bobcat gear, or caught in the air at an event! (Hmmm ... none of my departments ever gave me a T-shirt. I’d wear it proudly if they did.)

I know my story is basically unimportant, but probably not unique. Multiply it by hundreds or thousands of little people like me who live under the big radar beam.

To underestimate athletics as a touchstone to the university as a whole would be a very unwise mistake.
Multiply it by tens of thousands. The vast majority of discussion regarding MSU with my old college friends revolves around athletics. Athletics keep my connection current to both the university and old friends.

Re: Eastern Washington Looking at Cutting Football and/or Athletics

Posted: Sun Feb 16, 2020 11:16 pm
by grizband
Cataholic wrote:
Sun Feb 16, 2020 11:42 am
Bobcat4Ever wrote:
Sat Feb 15, 2020 11:44 pm
My Viewpoint — An Unimportant Short Story About MSU and Athletics.

(This discussion started me thinking about my web of MSU connections, past and present, and how athletics fits into it all. And why I think the faculty at EWU is on the wrong track with some of their options.)

I graduated from MSU, had a four year work-study job with a large research project, went to grad school under two different academic departments, was a GRA, worked at MSU forever, taught a few classes on an adjunct basis, retired from MSU. For a long time I used to stick my head into my departmental offices just to stay in touch, made friends over time with some of my favorite professors, the dean, and some upper echelon administrators etc. So, lots of involvement with MSU academics, most but not all from my student standing.

I’ve been a Bobcat fan since before I can remember. My mom and dad took me upstairs in Romney gym to watch my uncle play basketball for the Eastern (MSU-Billings) Yellowjackets. I was at the first Bobcat basketball game in the Fieldhouse. Attended football, men’s and women’s basketball, volleyball and track for well over 50 years. Still watch every game I can on TV or Pluto. So, lots of involvement with athletics.

Over time the academic offices changed, my professors retired and then passed on. The deans and acting deans marched in and out. I quit visiting because I knew no one there, and no one knew me. The only contact I ended up with were dunning letters. The dean sat right behind me at basketball, but was not friendly in the least.

If I were able to walk (or limp) into the athletic offices today, people would recognize me and say hello. A couple of head coaches would see me and stop for a quick chat.

If it were not for athletics, I would have really no connection with MSU. The games, when we could still attend, were wonderful places to mix and meet new people, including lots of academics and administrators. Networking, if you wish. A real boon to my career, as it turned out, even though I met a brand new president by kicking his wife out of my reserved seat! Met and chatted with President Cruzado her second day on campus because of a women’s basketball game. And mental health — nothing better than going to the Brick at the end of a cold, dark, gloomy winter’s day.

When we personally donate, it may not be to athletics, but it is because we are connected through athletics. I cannot imagine an MSU without athletics, or without football, or not competing at the highest level that makes sense. I’ve taken family members to games. One child enrolled (from California) and is still paying that big tuition.

We attend watch parties where MSU alumni gather and watch football. I’ve never been invited to get together and watch an engineering mechanics final. That’s no way intended as a joke — it’s an example of the importance of athletics in remaining connected to MSU. I wear things advertising MSU several days a week, and it often starts conversations. They all were purchased as Bobcat gear, or caught in the air at an event! (Hmmm ... none of my departments ever gave me a T-shirt. I’d wear it proudly if they did.)

I know my story is basically unimportant, but probably not unique. Multiply it by hundreds or thousands of little people like me who live under the big radar beam.

To underestimate athletics as a touchstone to the university as a whole would be a very unwise mistake.
Multiply it by tens of thousands. The vast majority of discussion regarding MSU with my old college friends revolves around athletics. Athletics keep my connection current to both the university and old friends.
Many good points in your post, and I think you'll find thousands of similar stories from campuses all over America. Yes, we all primarily attend colleges and universities for academics, but the extra curriculars (athletics, etc.) are what maintain the connections.

Re: Eastern Washington Looking at Cutting Football and/or Athletics

Posted: Mon Feb 17, 2020 10:09 am
by Montanabob

Re: Eastern Washington Looking at Cutting Football and/or Athletics

Posted: Tue Feb 18, 2020 8:45 am
by Catfanatic84
Bobcat4Ever wrote:
Sat Feb 15, 2020 11:44 pm
My Viewpoint — An Unimportant Short Story About MSU and Athletics.

(This discussion started me thinking about my web of MSU connections, past and present, and how athletics fits into it all. And why I think the faculty at EWU is on the wrong track with some of their options.)

I graduated from MSU, had a four year work-study job with a large research project, went to grad school under two different academic departments, was a GRA, worked at MSU forever, taught a few classes on an adjunct basis, retired from MSU. For a long time I used to stick my head into my departmental offices just to stay in touch, made friends over time with some of my favorite professors, the dean, and some upper echelon administrators etc. So, lots of involvement with MSU academics, most but not all from my student standing.

I’ve been a Bobcat fan since before I can remember. My mom and dad took me upstairs in Romney gym to watch my uncle play basketball for the Eastern (MSU-Billings) Yellowjackets. I was at the first Bobcat basketball game in the Fieldhouse. Attended football, men’s and women’s basketball, volleyball and track for well over 50 years. Still watch every game I can on TV or Pluto. So, lots of involvement with athletics.

Over time the academic offices changed, my professors retired and then passed on. The deans and acting deans marched in and out. I quit visiting because I knew no one there, and no one knew me. The only contact I ended up with were dunning letters. The dean sat right behind me at basketball, but was not friendly in the least.

If I were able to walk (or limp) into the athletic offices today, people would recognize me and say hello. A couple of head coaches would see me and stop for a quick chat.

If it were not for athletics, I would have really no connection with MSU. The games, when we could still attend, were wonderful places to mix and meet new people, including lots of academics and administrators. Networking, if you wish. A real boon to my career, as it turned out, even though I met a brand new president by kicking his wife out of my reserved seat! Met and chatted with President Cruzado her second day on campus because of a women’s basketball game. And mental health — nothing better than going to the Brick at the end of a cold, dark, gloomy winter’s day.

When we personally donate, it may not be to athletics, but it is because we are connected through athletics. I cannot imagine an MSU without athletics, or without football, or not competing at the highest level that makes sense. I’ve taken family members to games. One child enrolled (from California) and is still paying that big tuition.

We attend watch parties where MSU alumni gather and watch football. I’ve never been invited to get together and watch an engineering mechanics final. That’s no way intended as a joke — it’s an example of the importance of athletics in remaining connected to MSU. I wear things advertising MSU several days a week, and it often starts conversations. They all were purchased as Bobcat gear, or caught in the air at an event! (Hmmm ... none of my departments ever gave me a T-shirt. I’d wear it proudly if they did.)

I know my story is basically unimportant, but probably not unique. Multiply it by hundreds or thousands of little people like me who live under the big radar beam.

To underestimate athletics as a touchstone to the university as a whole would be a very unwise mistake.
Well said Bobcat4ever......I've lived out of state since the 90's...I make my way back to Bozeman once or twice a year....for an athletic event (football). I spend money in the bookstore, local restaurants, hotels etc. I would not have a reason to visit otherwise.

I think MSU has found a good balance between academics and athletics...academics has been on the receiving end for huge donations (Jabs/Asbjornson)...now we're seeing some $$ flowing to athletics facilities.

Great time to be a Bobcat!!